Best Lightweight Applications for Linux .

Tech Simplified

This is the list of some of the best Lightweight applications available in Linux . I hope you like it . Please give your feedback in comments .


Browsers :

  • Abaco A multi-page graphical web browser
  • Arora A cross platform web browser built using Qt and WebKit
  • Chromium The open-source project behind Google Chrome
  • Conkeror A highly programmable web browser based on Mozilla XULRunner
  • Dillo A small, fast graphical web browser built on FLTK
  • Elinks An advanced and well-established feature-rich text mode web browser
  • Hv3 A minimalist web browser based on tkhtml3
  • Kazehakase GTK+ web browser that uses the Gecko rendering engine
  • Links A text WWW browser, similar to Lynx
  • Midori is a lightweight web browser based on Gtk and WebKit. It passes the ACID3 test
  • Netsurf has its own rendering engine, is written in C and is extremely lightweight.
  • rekonq rekonq is a KDE browser based on Webkit. Its…

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Why the Ad-blocking War Could Hurt All of Us

As ad blockers proliferate, website are retaliating, and that’s a bad news for consumers as well as the Internet.

The Washington Post is now reportedly restricting content for users who block their ads, forcing them sign up a newsletter or subscribe the site instead. Underpinning this is software that can detect whether user is using an ad blocker form companies such as Sourcepoint. In addition, Apple and Google are now locked a battle for IOS’s ability to shut down the mobile ads.

If this continues, the users eventually find them between a rock and a hard place. They will either have to accept the annoying ads, cluttering up their email box with newsletters, or pay for the content that was formerly free.

Beyond news, ad blockers could also push the price of anything subsidizing by advertising. For example, Fandango.com impose a service charge on the sale the movie tickets through site but carries advertising on the site in order to supplement revenue. If the site is no longer able to monetize its ad space, it would likely raise ticket price for consumers to make up its lost profit. This can apply to thousands of business across the Internet.

The most disturbing aspect of this conflict is that there is no obvious solution to the problem. While users abhor ads, they would be equally turn off by having to pay more. While technology providers have every reason to provide the option to block ads, websites that rely on ads for revenue are highly motivated to thwart such technology and force users into a corner.

This threatens not only digital advertising but the very model of the Internet, which has been a medium that provides more choices and decrease cost for consumers for everything form music to news articles and household items. An all-out assault on advertising will disrupt this dynamic and make the Internet uneconomic for sellers and considerable more expensive for buyers.

To be fair, online vendors aren’t really blame for the conflict. They can’t survive without some type of revenue stream of in the absence of ads, they need to make up the difference from the consumers. And with 47% of U.S. web surfers regularly using ad blocking software, according to a University of Oxford study, and with ad blocker project to result in $20 billion of lost advertising revenues in the U.S. according to research by Adobe and PageFair, content provider are in dire straits.

But if two sides are unable to find a way to balance their respective needs, consumers will suffer. That’s why the war over ad blockers is much bigger deal than you realize.

Why the Ad-blocking War Could Hurt All of Us

As Ad-blockers proliferate, website are retaliating, and that's bad news for consumers as well as the Internet**

Restricting content for users who block their ads, forcing them to sign up for a newsletter or subscribe to the site instead.  Underpinning this is software that can detect whether a users is using ad blocker from companies such as Sourcepoint. In addition, Apple and Google are locked in a battle for IOS9’s ability to shut down the mobile ads.

If this continues, users could eventually find themselves between a rock and a hard place. They will either have to accept extremely annoying ads, clutter up their email box with newsletters, or have to pay for the content that was formerly free.

Beyond news, ad blockers could also push up the price of anything subsidized by advertising. For example, Fandango.com imposes a service charge on the sale of movie tickets through it’s site but also carries advertising in order to supplement revenue. If this site is no longer able to monetize ad space, it would likely raise ticket prices on consumers to make up for the lost profit. This can apply to thousand of businesses across the Internet.

This threatens not only digital advertising but very model of Internet, which has a medium to provide increased choice and decreased cost for consumers for everything from music to news articles and household items. An all-out assault on advertising will disrupt this dynamic and make the Internet uneconomical for sellers or considerably more expensive for buyers.

To be fair, online vendors aren’t really to blame for the conflict. They can’t survive without some type of revenue stream in the absence of ads, they need to make up the difference from consumers. And with 47% of U.S. web surfers regularly using ad blocking software, according to a University Of Oxford study, and with ad blocking projected to result in $20.3 billion of lost advertising revenue in the U.S in 2016, according to research by Adobe and PageFair, content providers are in dire straits.

But if two sides are unable to find a way to balance their respective needs, consumers will suffer. That’s why the war over ad blockers is much bigger deal than you realize.

Why don’t you try Linux?

I am a full time Linux user and I know a lot about it.  It’s a great system, does not spy on you, and make it difficult to get malware. In the past years, it also become a great platform for gaming, too. Here are the answers of a branch of questions I usually hear about Linux from Windows user.

Why would I want Linux?

Here are a handful of the reasons you might go for Linux over Windows.

  • Linux doesn’t spy on you, and Linux is not run by corporate interests, so you can be confident that it never be. Of course you can turn off some spying in Windows, but  wouldn’t it be better if there is no spying in the first place ?
  • Linux is very customizable – you can change it to suit your preferences and truly make it your own
  • It’s free. No need to drop $100 on Windows licenses for you next build. It also free as in “freedom” – a lot of people take this too seriously, but it just means you can do whatever you want with it. When Microsoft made the full screen start menu and you bitched about it, you couldn’t change it. On Linux, you can. If you are a programmer, the source code for nearly everything you use is available to you as well.
  • Working on you PC is a hobby. Building it from scratch is part of the fun of being in the  PC master race. Why stop at hardware? With Linux, you are use out of box and be happy, but if you want to you can tweak it and customize it and build it into your personal experience.
  • Easier to install software. On Windows, you google it, download the installer, run it, put in your password, and click “next” ten times, then you have it. On Linux, you type a command in terminal and put in your password, then you have it. There are also some graphic tools that you can search for software, press a button, put in your password, and then you have it.

What about games?

Ask me this question five years ago, and I would have told you that you’d be giving up games if you switched to Linux. However, though, that’s not true today. On top of that, I can play a lot of games with wine, which is software for Linux that lets you run many Windows programs. However, I’d be lying you if I said I would not be giving up some games. Most AAA games are unfortunately not ported on Linux until months or years after they are released. The solution many people turn to is called dual booting – it’s very easy to have both Linux and Windows on the same computer, and switch between them as easy as rebooting.

Why don’t you try Linux?

copy form https://theblogpirate.wordpress.com/2015/08/14/hey-you-why-dont-you-try-linux/

Hi my name is Anis! I am a full time linux user and I know a lot about it. It’s a great system, does not spy on you, and make it very difficult to make malware. In the past years, it become a great platform for gaming, too. Here’s the answers to a branch of questions I usually hear about Linux from Windows users.

Why would I want Linux?

Here is a handful of the reasons you might go for Linux over Windows:

  • Linux doesn’t spy on you, and it’s not run by corporate interests, so you can be confident that it never will. Sure you can turn off some spying on Windows, but wouldn’t be better if there was no spying in the first place.
  • Linux is very customizable – you can change it to suit your preferences and truly make it your own. Here’s a few more looks you could go for: Gnome 3, KDE plasma 5, and more.
  • It’s free. No need to drop $100 on a Windows license for you next build. It’s also free as in “freedom” – a lot of people think this too seriously, but it just means that you can do whatever you what with it. When Microsoft made the full screen Start Menu and you bitched about it, you couldn’t change it. On Linux, you can. If you are a programmer, the source code for nearly everything you use is available to you as well.
  • Working on your PC is a hobby. Building it form scratch is part of the fun of being in the PC master race. Why stop at the hardware, though?  With Linux, you can use the out of the box system and be happy, but if you what you can tweak it and customize it and build it into a very personal experience.
  • Easier to install Software. On Windows, you google it, and download a installer, run it, put your password, click “next” 10 times, and then you have it. On Linux, you enter one command one time on the terminal, put in your password, and then you have it. There are also graphics tools that you can search for software, click one button, put in your password, and then you have it.

What about games?

Ask me this question five years ago, and I would have told you that you’d be giving up games if you switch to Linux. Thankfully, though, it’s not true today. We have some games library such as Steam. There are many games on Linux I don’t have, too. On top of that, I’m able to play a lot of games with wine, which is a software for Linux that lets you run many Windows programs. However, I’d be lying to you if I said you wouldn’t be giving up some games. Most AAA games are unfortunately not ported to Linux until months or years after they’are released, and new games won’t work in wine until wine catches up with Windows. The solution most people turn to is called Dual booting – it’s very easy to have both Linux and Windows installed on the same computer, and switching between them is as easy as rebooting.

But are games on Linux slower?

This depends on the developers of the game in question. Linux provides openGL, which fills a similar niche to DirectX on Windows. OpenGL runs on more platforms – Windows, Linux, Max os and more, so many games on Windows are actually using OpenGl. The performance of both frameworks is comparable – Value, for example, was able to suqeeze more performance out of Left 4 Dead with OpenGL on Linux than with DirectX on Windows. On the other hand, PCSX2 has poorer performance on OpenGL when compared to the DirectX fronted. On even an entry level rig, though, you can export to have a good time. You are not likely to notice any difference in performance between Linux and Windows.

what’s this terminal thing? I am scared of text!

I heard stuff about Linux and Unix, what are the differences between them?

Unix is an operating system created by Bell Labs in the 70’s. It defines a certain way an operating system should behave, and Linux is a free implement of that behavior. OS X is another implement of Unix. For the most part, Linux and OS X are compatible. Windows is another operating system that is not implement of Unix, and programmers have to make a special version of their software to run on Windows.

What’s up with all these different kind of Linux?

You’ve probably heard of variety Linux distributions, of “distros”, like Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch Linux, Linux Mint, Gentoo, and so on. It seems complicated, but it’s actually simple. “Linux” itself just provide core functions of the system, things the users can’t really see, and the distro provides the look and the feel, default applications, and a handful of others things. It’s like this – imagine that a car company build a really good engine, and then give it off for free. A whole branch of people build their own cars, build around this engine. They might looks different, have different wheel and seats, but they are all cars, and they have this one engine design in common. That’s how Linux works – Linux is the engine, distro is the rest of the car.

But which one do I pick?

How does Linux avoid malware?

How hard is it to sitch?

TPO29(3rd): To improve the quality of education, universities should spend more money on salaries for university professors

With the rapid development of society, more and more elites are required for advance science and technology. So how to improve the quality of education becomes an emergence problem. Improve the facilities and equipment, designing attract sources, introducing famous professors, elevate salaries for professors or provide more resource for students like holding international meetings, all these strategies will solve this problem. So I think universities should take multiple methods to improve the quality of education rather than only spending money on professors.

As a boost enrollment of universities nowadays, there are so many students attending college that require more funding and resource. So universities should employ more faculties, purchase more facilities to cope with the increase population in campus. Only that happens that every student will get equal chance to gain knowledge and share the colorful campus life. For instance, when I was a fresh student in the college, owing to so many students want to study in library that I need to get up early and rush the way to get a seat, limited seats in library influences students’ study passion which leads to the decline of the quality of education in the end. So I thins the most thing to improve the equality of education is to make facilities perfect.

What’s more, universities should hold some international communicating meetings and introduce professors who are talent, knowledge and prestige. So students can have more opportunities to share the advanced achievement and communicate the professors who are famous in their interested field. I think that will inspire students’ creativity, intelligence and imagination which need in the college study, and they will contribute more to the university and the society.

Admittedly, universities should increase salaries for professors. A college teacher is more responsible for the quality of education because of the college life maybe the last stage of students’ study period before taking a job. What a student do after graduate from college depend on what knowledge and skills they gain from the college and the professors. So professors will be more dedicated to their work with high pay which lead more useful people graduate from school.

All in all, if universities have enough they should take variety ways to improve the quality of education, especially what I mentioned above.

TPO30(2nd): It is more enjoyable have a job where you work only three day a week for a long hours than have a job where you work five day a week for shorter hours.

The average American works five days a week. We are long used the social norm “eight hours labor, eight hours recreation, eight hours rest”. However, it has little to do with efficiency or productivity. Personally speaking, I prefer working long hours instead of spending more time on traveling to work on daily basis.

First, working long hours means one can have more time for  vocation. For one thing, time professionals spent commuting everyday can be spent with their family, doing exercise routine, or taking a diet. In this way, when they back to work, the employers will have energetic works with clear mind, thus boosting their output and profit as a result. If it’s not enough, people with long time to relax has been proved to be more creative and productive. When Henry Ford in 1914 famously took the radical step of doubling their worker’s pay, and cut shifts in Ford plants from nine hours to eight, he get bitterly criticized by the association of manufactures. However, when his competitors saw his business boomed in the next few years, they adopted the same hourly rate. Especially in innovative industries, employees with more spare time always tend to be more creative, for  they have more time to reflect on their current work and breed new ideas.

Second, working long hours also means achieve consistency. People cannot guarantee that all one’s work can be finished within eight hours. Here comes the dilemma. One can either working late to finish it, or restart the work next day. Anyone who has been in this situation knows latter one means spending more time on it and low efficiency, while the first one means, willingly or not, one has to work in unpaid overtime. In this respect, allowing people to arrange their time flexibly is a way to fix the problem. If employee choose to work long hours to finish the work within a day, they should get paid and and be allowed to rest in the following day to compensate “off-the-clock” hours.

Admittedly, working long hours can increase the healthy risk and generate more stress. But we are not talking about it as a daily routine. We are talking about having this schedule less than half of a week. So allocating time wisely, in most cases one can avoid those negative impact and enjoy their lives more.

People take for granted of the eight hour workday, rarely raising questions about the efficiency and the effectiveness as consequences. If professionals are given options, I believe they will appreciate the shorter week more, and so as the employers.